An Asset Management / Inventory trick

Last week we discussed the nuances between Inventory, Asset and Config Management within an OSS stack. Each one of these tools are designed to supports functionality for different users / persona-groups. However, they also tend to have significant functional overlap. Chances are your organisation doesn’t have separate dedicated tools for each.

So today I’m going to share a trick I’ve used in the past when I’ve only had a PNI (Physical Network Inventory) system to work with, but need to perform asset management style functionality.

Most inventory tools are great at storing the current state of a device that exists in a network. However, they don’t tend to be so great at an asset manager’s primary function – tracking the entire life-cycle of an asset from procurement to decommissioning and sparing / maintenance along the way.

Normally the PNI just records the locations of all the active network equipment – in buildings, exchanges, comms-huts, cabinets, etc. The trick I use is to create an additional location/s for warehouses. They may (or may not) reside in the physical location of your real warehouse/s.

In almost all PNI systems, you have control over the status of the device (eg IN-SERVICE, etc). You can use this functionality to include status of SPARE, UNDER REPAIR, etc and switch a device between active network locations and the warehouse.

These status-change records give you the ability to pin-point the location of a given asset at any point in time. It also gives you trending stats, either as an individual device or as a cohort of devices (eg by make/model).

You can even build processes around it for check-in / check-out of the warehouse and maintenance scheduling.

I should point out that this works if your PNI allows you to uniquely identify a device (eg by make/model + serial number or perhaps a unique naming convention instance). If your PNI device records only show the current function of a device (eg a naming convention like SiteA-Router-0001), then you might lose sight of the device’s trail when it moves through life-cycle states (eg to the warehouse).

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