An OSS automation mind-flip

I recently had something of a perspective-flip moment in relation to automation within the realm of OSS.

In the past, I’ve tended to tackle the automation challenge from the perspective of applying automated / scripted responses to tasks that are done manually via the OSS. But it’s dawned on me that I have it around the wrong way! It is an incremental perspective on the main objective of automations – global zero-touch networks.

If we take all of the tasks performed by all of the OSS around the globe, the number of variants is incalculable… which probably means the zero-touch problem is unsolvable (we might be able to solve for many situations, but not all).

The more solvable approach would be to develop a more homogeneous approach to network self-care / self-optimisation. In other words, the majority of the zero-touch challenge is actually handled at the equivalent of EMS level and below (I’m perhaps using out-dated self-healing terminology, but hopefully terminology that’s familiar to readers) and only cross-domain issues bubble up to OSS level.

As the diagram below describes, each layer up abstracts but connects (as described in more detail in “What an OSS shouldn’t do“). That is, each higher layer in the stack reduces the amount if information/control within a domain that it’s responsible for, but it assumes more a broader responsibility for connecting domains together.
OSS abstract and connect

The abstraction process reduces the number of self-healing variants the OSS needs to handle. But to cope with the complexity of self-caring for connected domains, we need a more homogeneous set of health information being presented up from the network.

Whereas the intent model is designed to push actions down into the lower layers with a standardised, simplified language, this would be the reverse – pushing network health knowledge up to higher layers to deal with… in a standard, consistent approach.

And BTW, unlike the pervading approach of today, I’m clearly saying that when unforeseen (or not previously experienced) scenarios appear within a domain, they’re not just kicked up to OSS, but the domains are stoic enough to deal with the situation inside the domain.

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