Can OSS/BSS assist CX? We’re barely touching the surface

Have you ever experienced an epic customer experience (CX) fail when dealing a network service operator, like the one I described yesterday?

In that example, the OSS/BSS, and possibly the associated people / process, had a direct impact on poor customer experience. Admittedly, that 7 truck-roll experience was a number of years ago now.

We have fewer excuses these days. Smart phones and network connected devices allow us to get OSS/BSS data into the field in ways we previously couldn’t. There’s no need for printed job lists, design packs and the like. Our OSS/BSS can leverage these connected devices to give far better decision intelligence in real time.

If we look to the logistics industry, we can see how parcel tracking technologies help to automatically provide status / progress to parcel recipients. We can see how recipients can also modify their availability, which automatically adjusts logistics delivery sequencing / scheduling.

This has multiple benefits for the logistics company:

  • It increases first time delivery rates
  • Improves the ability to automatically notify customers (eg email, SMS, chatbots)
  • Decreases customer enquiries / complaints
  • Decreases the amount of time the truck drivers need to spend communicating back to base and with clients
  • But most importantly, it improves the customer experience

Logistics is an interesting challenge for our OSS/BSS due to the sheer volume of customer interaction events handled each day.

But it’s another area that excites me even more, where CX is improved through improved data quality:

  • It’s the ability for field workers to interact with OSS/BSS data in real-time
  • To see the design packs
  • To compare with field situations
  • To update the data where there is inconsistency.

Even more excitingly, to introduce augmented reality to assist with decision intelligence for field work crews:

  • To provide an overlay of what fibres need to be spliced together
  • To show exactly which port a patch-lead needs to connect to
  • To show where an underground cable route goes
  • To show where a cable runs through trayway in a data centre
  • etc, etc

We’re barely touching the surface of how our OSS/BSS can assist with CX.

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