Drinking from the OSS firehose

Most people know what they want, but don’t know how to get it. When you don’t know the next step, you procrastinate or feel lost. But a little research can turn a vague desire into specific actions.
For example: When musicians say, “I need a booking agent”, I ask, “Which one? What’s their name?”
You can’t act on a vague desire. But with an hour of research you could find the names of ten booking agents that work with ten artists you admire. Then you’ve got a list of the next ten people you need to contact.
A life coach told me that most of his job is just helping people get specific. Once they turn a vague goal into a list of specific steps, it’s easy to take action
.”
Derek Sivers
in his blog, “Get Specific!

In a post last week, I spoke about feeling like never before that I’m at an OSS cross-road, looking towards a set of paths. The paths all contribute heavily to the next-generations of OSS, but there’s the feeling of dread that no one person will have the ability to step out each path. The paths I’m talking about include network virtualisation, data-science / artificial-intelligence / machine-learning, open-source deployments like ONAP, cloud infrastructure and delivery models, and so many more. Each represents a life’s work to become a fully-fledged expert.

In the past, a single OSS polymath could potentially scramble along a majority of the paths and understand the terrain within their local OSS environment. But that’s becoming increasingly less likely as we become ever more dependent upon the interconnection of disparate expertise.

This represents a growing risk. If nobody understands the whole terrain, how do we map out Derek’s “list of specific steps” on our complex OSS projects? If we can’t adequately break down the work, we’re at risk of running projects as a set of vague, disjointed activities. So I imagine you’re wondering how we do “Get Specific!”?

Most technology experts appear to me to have a predilection to plan projects from the bottom up (ie building up a solution from their detailed understanding of some parts of the project). However, on projects as complex as OSS, I’ve never seen a bottom-up plan come together efficiently. Nobody knows enough of the details to build up the entire plan.

Instead, I prefer the top-down approach of building a WBS (work breakdown structure), progressively diving deeper into the details and turning the vague goal into a tree of ever more specific steps. I consider the ability to break down complex projects into manageable chunks of work as my only real super-power, but in reality it largely just comes from using the WBS approach.

Okay, it might sound a bit like a waterfall model (depends on how you design the tree really), but it beats the “trying to drink from a firehose” alternative model.

Which approach works best for you?

The answer is soooo obvious…. or is it?

There’s a crowded room of OSS experts, a room filled with serious intellectual horsepower. You might be a virtu-OSS-o, but you surely know that there’s still so much to be learnt from those around you. You have the chance to unlock the experiences and insights of your esteemed colleagues. But how? The answer might seem to be obvious. You do so by asking questions. Lots of questions.

But that obvious answer might have just one little unexpected twist.

Do you ask:

  1. Ego questions – questions that demonstrate how clever you are (and thus prove to the other experts that you too are an expert); OR
  2. Embarrassing questions – questions that could potentially embarrass you (and demonstrate major deficiencies in your knowledge, perhaps suggesting that you’re not as much of as expert as everyone else)

I’ve been in those rooms and heard the questions, as you have too no doubt. What do you think the ratio of ego to embarrassing would typically be? 10 to 1? 20 to 1?

The problem with the ego questions is that they can be so specific to the context of a few that they end up steering the conversations to the depths of technology hell (of course they can also end up inspiring / enlightening too, so I’m generalising here).

But have you observed that the very best in our industry happen to ask a lot of embarrassing  questions?

A quote by Ramit Sethi splices in brilliantly here, “The very best ask lots of questions. 3 questions I almost never hear: (1) “Just a second. If you don’t mind me asking, how did you get to that?” (2) “I’m not sure I understand the conclusion — can you walk me through that?” (3) “How did you see that answer?” Ask these questions and stop worrying about being embarrassed. How else are you going to learn?

Just for laughs, next time you’re at one of these events (and I notice that TM Forum Live is coming up in May), try to guess what the ego to embarrassing ratio might be there and which set of questions are spawning the more interesting / insightful / helpful conversations.

Dan Pink’s 6 critical OSS senses

I recently wrote an article that spoke about the obsolescence of jobs in OSS, particularly as a result of Artificial Intelligence.

But an article by someone much more knowledgeable about AI than me, Rodney Brooks, had this to say, “We are surrounded by hysteria about the future of artificial intelligence and robotics — hysteria about how powerful they will become, how quickly, and what they will do to jobs.” He then describes The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions here.

Back into my box I go, tail between my legs! Nonetheless, the premise of my article still holds true. The world of OSS is changing quickly and we’re constantly developing new automations, so our roles will inevitably change. My article also proposed some ideas on how to best plan our own adaptation.

That got me thinking… Many people in OSS are “left-brain” dominant right? But left-brained jobs (ie repeatable, predictable, algorithmic) can be more easily out-sourced or automated, thus making them more prone to obsolescence. That concept reminded me of Daniel Pink’s premise in A Whole New Mind where right-brained skills become more valuable so this is where our training should be focused. He argues that we’re on the cusp of a new era that will favor “conceptual” thinkers like artists, inventors and storytellers. [and OSS consultants??]

He also implores us to enhance six critical senses, namely:

  • Design – the ability to create something that’s emotionally and/or visually engaging
  • Story – to create a compelling and persuasive narrative
  • Symphony – the ability to synthesise new insights, particularly from seeing the big picture
  • Empathy – the ability to understand and care for others
  • Play – to create a culture of games, humour and play, and
  • Meaning – to find a purpose that will provide an almost spiritual fulfillment.

I must admit that I hadn’t previously thought about adding these factors to my development plan. Had you?
Do you agree with Dan Pink or will you continue to opt for left-brain skills / knowledge enhancement?

Finding the most important problems to solve

The problem with OSS is that there are too many problems. We don’t have to look too hard to find a problem that needs solving.

An inter-related issue is that we’re (almost always) constrained by resources and aren’t able to solve every problem we find. I have a theory – As much as you are skilled at solving OSS problems, it’s actually your skill at deciding which problem to solve that’s more important.

With continuous release methodologies gaining favour, it’s easy to prioritise on the most urgent or easiest problems to solve. But what if we were to apply the Warren Buffett 20 punch-card approach to tackling OSS problems?

I could improve your ultimate financial welfare by giving you a ticket with only twenty slots in it so that you had twenty punches – representing all the investments that you got to make in a lifetime. And once you’d punched through the card, you couldn’t make any more investments at all. Under those rules, you’d really think carefully about what you did, and you’d be forced to load up on what you’d really thought about. So you’d do so much better.”
Warren Buffett
.

I’m going through this exact dilemma at the moment – am I so busy giving attention to the obvious problems that I’m not allowing enough time to discover the most important ones? I figure that anyone can see and get caught up in the noise of the obvious problems, but only a rare few can listen through it…

Bringing Eminem’s blank canvas to OSS

“When you start out in your career, you have a blank canvas, so you can paint anywhere that you want because the shit ain’t been painted on yet. And then your second album comes out, and you paint a little more and you paint a little more. By the time you get to your seventh and eighth album you’ve already painted all over it. There’s nowhere else to paint.”
Eminem. (on Rick Rubin and Malcolm Gladwell’s Broken Record podcast)

To each their own. Personally, Eminem’s music has never done it for me, whether his first or eighth album, but the quote above did strike a chord (awful pun).

It takes many, many hours to paint in the detail of an OSS painting. By the time a product has been going for a few years, there’s not much room left on the canvas and the detail of the existing parts of the work is so nuanced that it’s hard to contemplate painting over.

But this doesn’t consider that over the years, OSS have been painted on many different canvases. First there were mainframes, then client-server, relational databases, XaaS, virtualisation (of servers and networks), and a whole continuum in between… not to mention the future possibilities of blockchain, AI, IoT, etc. And that’s not even considering the changes in programming languages along the way. In fact, new canvases are now presenting themselves at a rate that’s hard to keep up with.

The good thing about this is that we have the chance to start over with a blank canvas each time, to create something uniquely suited to that canvas. However, we invariably attempt to bring as much of the old thinking across as possible, immediately leaving little space left to paint something new. Constraints that existed on the old canvas don’t always apply to each new canvas, but we still have a habit of bringing them across anyway.

We don’t always ask enough questions like:

  • Does this existing process still suit the new canvas
  • Can we skip steps
  • Can we obsolete any of the old / unused functionality
  • Are old and new architectures (at all levels) easily transmutable
  • Does the user interface need to be ported or replaced
  • Do we even need a user interface (assuming the rise of machine-to-machine with IoT, etc)
  • Does the old data model have any relevance to the new canvas
  • Do the assurance rules of fixed-network services still apply to virtualised networks
  • Do the fulfillment rules of fixed-network services still apply to virtualised networks
  • Are there too many devices to individually manage or can they be managed as a cohort
  • Does the new model give us access to new data and/or techniques that will allow us to make decisions (or derive insights) differently
  • Does the old billing or revenue model still apply to the new platform
  • Can we increase modularity and abstraction between modules

“The real reason “blockchain” or “AI” may actually change businesses now or in the future, isn’t that the technology can do remarkable things that can’t be done today, it’s that it provides a reason for companies to look at new ways of working, new systems and finally get excited about what can be done when you build around technology.”
Tom Goodwin
.

I’m predicting the demise of the OSS horse

“What will telcos do about the 30% of workers AI is going to displace?”
Dawn Bushaus

That question, which is the headline of Dawn’s article on TM Forum’s Inform platform, struck me as being quite profound.

As an aside, I’m not interested in the number – the 30% – because I concur with Tom Goodwin’s sentiments on LinkedIn, “There is a lot of nonsense about AI.
Next time someone says “x% of businesses will be using AI by 2020” or “AI will be worth $xxxBn by 2025” or any of those other generic crapspeak comments, know that this means nothing.
AI is a VERY broad area within computer science that includes about 6-8 very different strands of work. It spans robotics, image recognition, machine learning, natural language processing, speech recognition and far more. Nobody agrees on what is and isn’t in this.
This means it covers everything from superintelligence to artificial creativity to chatbots
.”

For the purpose of this article, let’s just say that in 5 years AI will replace a percentage of jobs that we in tech / telco / OSS are currently doing. I know at least a few telcos that have created updated operating plans built around a headcount reduction much greater than the 30% mentioned in Dawn’s article. This is despite the touchpoint explosion and increased complexity that is already beginning to crash down onto us and will continue apace over the next 5 years.

Now, assuming you expect to still be working in 5 years time and are worried that your role might be in the disappearing 30% (or whatever percentage), what do you do now?

First, figure out what the modern equivalents of the horse are in the context of Warren Buffett’s quote below:

“What you really should have done in 1905 or so, when you saw what was going to happen with the auto is you should have gone short horses. There were 20 million horses in 1900 and there’s about 4 million now. So it’s easy to figure out the losers, the loser is the horse. But the winner is the auto overall. [Yet] 2000 companies (carmakers) just about failed.”

It seems impossible to predict how AI (all strands) might disrupt tech / telco / OSS in the next 5 years – and like the auto industry, more impossible to predict the winners (the technologies, the companies, the roles). However, it’s almost definitely easier to predict the losers.

Massive amounts are being invested into automation (by carriers, product vendors and integrators), so if the investments succeed, operational roles are likely to be net losers. OSS are typically built to make operational roles more efficient – but if swathes of operator roles are automated, then does operational support also become a net loser? In its current form, probably yes.

Second, if you are a modern-day horse, ponder which of your skills are transferable into the future (eg chassis building, brakes, steering, etc) and which are not (eg buggy-whip making, horse-manure collecting, horse grooming, etc). Assuming operator-driven OSS activities will diminish, but automation (with or without AI) will increase, can you take your current networks / operations knowledge and combine that with up-skilling in data, software and automation tools?

Even if OSS user interfaces are made redundant by automation and AI, we’ll still need to feed the new technologies with operations-style data, seed their learning algorithms and build new operational processes around them.

The next question is double-edged – for both individuals and telcos alike – how are you up-skilling for a future without horses?

A summary of RPA uses in an OSS suite

This is the sixth and final post in a series about the four styles of RPA (Robotic Process Automation) in OSS.

Over the last few days, we’ve looked into the following styles of RPA used in OSS, their implementation approaches, pros / cons and the types of automation they’re best suited to:

  1. Automating repeatable tasks – using an algorithmic approach to completing regular, mundane tasks
  2. Streamlining processes / tasks – using an algorithmic approach to assist an operator during a process or as an alternate integration technique
  3. Predefined decision support – guiding operators through a complex decision process
  4. As part of a closed-loop system – that provides a learning, improving solution

RPA tools can significantly improve the usability of an OSS suite, especially for end-to-end processes that jump between different applications (in the many ways mentioned in the above links).

However, there can be a tendency to use the power of RPAs to “solve all problems” (see this article about automating bad processes). That can introduce a life-cycle of pain for operators and RPA admins alike. Like any OSS integration, we should look to keep the design as simple and streamlined as possible before embarking on implementation (subtraction projects).

RPA in OSS feedback loops

This is the fifth in a series about the four styles of RPA (Robotic Process Automation) in OSS.

The fourth of those styles is as part of a closed-loop system such as the one described here. Here’s a diagram from that link:
OSS / DSS feedback loop

This is the most valuable style of RPA because it represents a learning and improving system.

Note though that RPA tools only represent the DSS (Decision Support System) component of the closed-loop so they need to be supplemented with the other components. Also note that an RPA tool can only perform the DSS role in this loop if it can accept feedback (eg via an API) and modify its output in response. The RPA tool could then perform fully automated tasks (ie machine-to-machine) or semi-automated (Decision support for humans).

Setting up this type of solution can be far more challenging than the earlier styles of RPA use, but the results are potentially the most powerful too.

Almost any OSS process could be enhanced by this closed-loop model. It’s just a case of whether the benefits justify the effort. Broad examples include assurance (network health / performance), fulfilment / activations, operations, strategy, etc.

The OSS / RPA parrot on the shoulder analogy

This is the fourth in a series about the four styles of RPA (Robotic Process Automation) in OSS.

The third style is Decision Support. I refer to this style as the parrot on the shoulder because the parrot (RPA) guides the operator through their daily activities. It isn’t true automation but it can provide one of the best cost-benefit ratios of the different RPA styles. It can be a great blend of human-computer decision making.

OSS processes tend to have complex decision trees and need different actions performed depending on the information being presented. An example might be a customer on-boarding, which includes credit and identity check sub-processes, followed by the customer service order entry.

The RPA can guide the operator to perform each of the steps along the process including the mandatory fields to populate for regulatory purposes. It can also recommend the correct pull-down options to select so that the operator traverses the correct branch of the decision tree of each sub-process.

This functionality can allow organisations to deliver less training than they would without decision support. It can be highly cost-effective in situations where:

  • There are many inexperienced operators, especially if there is high staff turnover such as in NOCs, contact centres, etc
  • It is essential to have high process / data quality
  • The solution isn’t intuitive and it is easy to miss steps, such as a process that requires an operator to swivel-chair between multiple applications
  • There are many branches on the decision tree, especially when some of the branches are rarely traversed, even by experienced operators

In these situations the cost of training can far outweigh the cost of building an OSS (RPA) parrot on each operator’s shoulder.

The four styles of RPA used in OSS

You’re probably already aware of RPA (Robotic Process Automation) tools. You’ve possibly even used one (or more) to enhance your OSS experience. In some ways, they’re a really good addition to your OSS suite. In some ways, potentially not. That all comes down to the way you use them.

There are four main ways that I see them being used (but happy for you to point out others):

  1. Automating repeatable tasks – following an algorithmic approach to getting regular, mundane tasks done (eg weekly report generation)
  2. Streamlining processes / tasks – again following an algorithmic approach to assist an operator during a process (eg reducing the amount of data entry when there is duplication between systems)
  3. Predefined decision support – to guide operators through a process that involves making different decisions based on the information being presented (eg in a highly regulated or complex process, with many options, RPA rules can ensure quality remains high)
  4. As part of a closed-loop system – if your RPA tool can handle changes to its rules through feedback (ie not just static rules) then it can become an important part of a learning, improving solution

You’ll notice an increasing level of sophistication from 1-4. Not just sophistication but potential value to operators too.

We’ll take a closer look at the use of RPA in OSS over the next couple of days.

The two types of disruptive technologists

OSS is an industry that’s undergoing constant, and massive change. But it still hasn’t been disrupted in the modern sense of that term. It’s still waiting to have its Uber/AirBnB-moment, where the old way becomes almost obsoleted by the introduction of a new way. OSS is not just waiting, but primed for disruption.

It’s a massive industry in terms of revenues, but it’s still far from delivering everything that customers want/need. It’s potentially even holding back the large-scale service provider industry from being even more influential / efficient in the current digital communications world. Our recent OSS Call for Innovation spelled out the challenges and opportunities in detail.

Today we’ll talk about the two types of disruptive technologists – one that assists change and one that hinders.

The first disruptive technologist is a rare beast – they’re the innovators who create solutions that are distinctly different from anything else in the market, changing the market (for the better) in the process. As discussed in this recent post, most of the significant changes occurring to OSS have been extrinsic (from adjacent industries like IT or networking rather than OSS). We need more of these.

The second disruptive technologist is all too common – they’re the technologists whose actions disrupt an OSS implementation. They’re usually well-intended, but can get in the way of innovation in two main ways:
1) By not looking beyond incremental change to existing solutions
2) Halting momentum by creating and resolving a million “what if?” scenarios

Most of us probably fall into the second category more often than the first. We need to reverse that trend individually and collectively though don’t we?

Would you like to nominate someone who stands out as being the first type of disruptive technologist and why?

What is your OSS answer : question ratio?

Experts know a lot…. obviously.
They have lots of answers… obviously.

There are lots of OSS experts. Combined, they know A LOT!!

Powerful indeed, but not sure if that’s what we need right now. I feel like we’re in a bit of an OSS innovation funk. The biggest improvements in OSS are coming from outside OSS – extrinsic improvement.

Where’s the intrinsic improvement coming from? Do we need someone to shake it up (do we need everyone to shake it up?)? Do we need new thinking to identify and create new patterns? To re-organise and revolutionise what the experts already know. Or do we need to ask the massive questions that re-frame the situation for the experts?

So, considering this funky moment in time, is the real expert the one who knows lots of answers… or the person who can catalyse change by asking the best mind-shift questions?

May I ask you – As an OSS expert, are you prouder of your answers…. or your questions?

To tackle that from a different angle – What is your answer : question ratio? Are you such an important expert that your day is so full of giving brilliant answers that you have no time left to ruminate and develop brilliant questions?

If so, can we take some of your answer time back and re-prioritise it please?

In the words of Socrates, “I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.

The future of telco / service provider consulting

Change happens when YOU and I DO things. Not when we argue.”
James Altucher
.

We recently discussed how ego can cause stagnation in OSS delivery. The same post also indicated how smart contracts potentially streamline OSS delivery and change management.

Along similar analytical lines, there’s a structural shift underway in traditional business consulting, as described in a recent post contrasting “clean” and “dirty” consulting. There’s an increasing skepticism in traditional “gut-feel” or “set-and-forget” (aka clean) consulting and a greater client trust in hard data / analytics and end-to-end implementation (dirty consulting).

Clients have less need for consultants that just turn the ignition and lay out sketchy directions, but increasingly need ones that can help driving the car all the way to their desired destination.

Consultants capable of meeting these needs for the telco / service provider industries have:

  • Extensive coal-face (delivery) experience, seeing and learning from real success and failure situations / scenarios
  • An ability to use technology to manage, interpret and visualise real data in a client’s data stores, not just industry trend data
  • An ability to build repeatable frameworks (including the development of smart contracts)
  • A mix of business, IT and network / tech expertise, like all valuable tripods

Have you noticed that the four key features above are perfectly aligned with having worked in OSSOSS/BSS data stores contain information that’s relevant to all parts of a telco / service provider business. That makes us perfectly suited to being the high-value consultants of the future, not just contractors into operations business units.

Few consultancy tasks are productisable today, but as technology continues to advance, traditional consulting roles will increasingly be replaced by IP (Intellectual Property) frameworks, data analytics, automations and tools… as long as the technology provides real business benefit.

Bad OSS ego decisions

A long, long time ago Dennis Haslinger told me that most of the most serious mistakes I would make in life would be bad ego decisions. I have found that to be true.”
Gary Halbert
.

OSS is an industry filled with highly intelligent people. In every country I’ve visited to work on OSS assignments, perhaps excluding Vietnam, my colleagues have been predominantly male. Dare I say it, do those two preceding facts imply a significant ego level exists on many (most?) OSS projects (or has it just been a coincidence that I’ve experienced)?

Given that OSS projects tend to cross business units, inter-departmental power plays like the one described in the Dilbert comic below can become just another potential pitfall.
Dilbert - I found a way to save a million dollars

To be honest, I can’t recall any examples where ego (mine or others) has lead to serious mistakes as such, but I’ve seen many cases where it’s lead to serious stagnation, delays in project delivery, that have been extremely costly.

One example is cited in this post, where the intellectual brilliance of one person caused a document to blow out from 30 pages to 150+, causing a 3+ month delay and more than $100k additional cost.

Stakeholder management and change management are highly underestimated factors in the success of OSS projects.

PS. The “intellectual brilliance” link above also talks about the possible benefits of smart contracts in OSS delivery. I wonder whether smart contracts will reduce some of the ego-related stagnation on OSS projects, or simply shift it from the delivery phase to the up-front smart contract agreement phase, thus introducing more “what if scenario” stagnation?

To reduce OSS dark data (or not)?

Dark data is the name for data that is collected but never used.
lt’s said that 96-98% of all data is dark data (not that I can confirm or deny those claims).

Dark data forms the bottom layer in the DIKW hierarchy below (image sourced from here).
DIKW hierarchy

What would the dark data percentage be within OSS do you think? Or more specifically, your OSS?

If you’re not going to use it, then why collect it?

I have two conflicting trains of thought here:

  • The Minimum Viable Data perspective; and
  • It’s relatively cheap and easy to collect / store raw data if an interface is already built, so hoard it all just in case your data scientists (or automated data algorithms) ever need it

Where do you sit on the data collection spectrum?

Can you re-skill fast enough to justify microservices?

There’s some things that I’ve challenged my team to do. We have to be faster than the web scale players and that sounds audacious. I tell them you can’t you can’t go to the bus station and catch a bus that’s already left the station by getting on a bus. We have to be faster than the people that we want to get to. And that sounds like an insane goal but that’s one of the goals we have. We have to speed up to catch the web scale players.”
John Donovan
, AT&T at this link.

Last week saw a series of articles appear here on the PAOSS blog around the accumulation of tech-debt and how microservices / Agile had the potential to accelerate that accumulation.

The part that I find most interesting about this new approach to telco (or more to the point, to the Digital Service Provider (DSP) model) is that it speaks of a shift to being software companies like the OTT players. Most telcos are definitely “digital” companies, but very few could be called “software” companies.

All telcos have developers on their payroll but how many would have software roles filling more than 5% of their workforce? How many would list their developer pools amongst a handful of core strengths? I’d hazard a guess that the roots of most telcos’ core strengths would’ve been formed decades ago.

Software-centric networks are on the rise. Rapid implementation models like DevOps and Agile are on the rise. API / Microservice interfaces to network domains (irrespective of being VNF, PNF, etc) are on the rise. Software, software, software.

In response, telcos are talking software. Talking, but how many are doing?

Organic transition of the workforce (ie boomers out, millennials in) isn’t going to refresh fast enough. Are telcos actively re-inventing their resource pool? Are they re-skilling on a grand scale, often tens of thousands of people, to cater for a future mode of operation where software is a core capability like it is at the OTT players? Re-skilling at a speed that’s faster than the web-scale bus?

If they can’t, or don’t, then perhaps software is not really the focus. Software isn’t their differentiator… they do have many other strengths to work with after all.

If so then OSS, microservices, SDN / NFV, DevOps, etc are key operational requirements without being core differentiators. So therefore should they all be outsourced to trusted partners / vendors / integrators (rather than the current insourcing trend), thus delegating the responsibility for curating the tech-debt we spoke about last week?

I’m biased. I see OSS as a core differentiator (if done well), but few agree with me.

Can the OSS mammoths survive extinction?

Startups win with data. Mammoths go extinct with products.”
Jay Sharma
.

Interesting phraseology. I love the play on words with the term mammoths. There are some telcos that are mammoth in size but are threatened with extinction though changes in environment and new competitors appearing.

I tend to agree with the intent of the quote, but also have some reservations. For example, products are still a key part of the business model of digital phenoms like Google, Facebook, etc. It’s their compelling products that allow them to collect the all-important data. As consumers, we want the product, they get our data. We also want the products sold by the Mammoths but perhaps they don’t leverage the data entwined in our usage (or more importantly, the advertising revenues that gets attracted to all that usage) as well as the phenoms do.

Another interesting play on words exists here for the telcos – in the “winning with data.” Telcos are losing at data (their profitability per bit is rapidly declining to the point of commoditisation), so perhaps a mindset shift is required. Moving the business model that’s built on the transport of data to a model based on the understanding of, and learning from, data. It’s certainly not a lack of data that’s holding them back. Our OSS / BSS collect and curate plenty. The difference is that Google’s and Facebook’s customers are advertisers, whilst the Mammoths’ customers are subscribers.

As OSS providers, the question remains for us to solve – how can we provide the products that allow the Mammoths to win with data?

PS. The other part of this equation is the rise of data privacy regulations such as GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation). Is it just me, or do the Mammoths seem to attract more attention in relation to privacy of our data than the OTT service providers?

Analytics and OSS seasonality

Seasonality is an important factor for network and service assurance. It’s also known as time-of-day/week/month/year specific activity.

For example, we often monitor network health through the analysis of performance metrics (eg CPU utilisation) and set up thresholds to alert us if those metrics go above (or below) certain levels. The most basic threshold is a fixed one (eg if a CPU goes above 95% utilisation, then raise an alert). However, this might just create unnecessary activity. Perhaps we do an extract at 2am every evening, which causes CPU utilisation to bounce at nearly 100% for long perids of time. We don’t want to receive an alert in the middle of the night for what might be expected behaviour.

Another example might be a higher network load for phone / SMS traffic on major holidays or during disaster events.

The great thing about modern analytics tools is that as long as they have long time series of data, then they can spot patterns of expected behaviour at certain times/dates that humans might not be observing and adjust alerting accordingly. This reduces the number of spurious notifications for network assurance operators to chase up on.

10 ways to #GetOutOfTheBuilding

Eric Ries’ “The Lean Startup,” has a short chapter entitled, “Get out of the Building.” It basically describes getting away from your screen – away from reading market research, white papers, your business plan, your code, etc – and out into customer-land. Out of your comfort zone and into a world of primary research that extends beyond talking to your uncle (see video below for that reference!).

This concept applies equally well to OSS product developers as it does to start-up entrepreneurs. In fact the concept is so important that the chapter name has inspired it’s own hashtag (#GetOutOfTheBuilding).

This YouTube video provides 10 tips for getting out of the building (I’ve started the clip at Tendai Charasika’s list of 10 ways but you may want to scroll back a bit for his more detailed descriptions).

But there’s one thing that’s even better than getting out of the building and asking questions of customers. After all, customers don’t always tell the complete truth (even when they have good intentions). No, the better research is to observe what they do, not what they say. #ObserveWhatTheyDoNotWhatTheySay

This could be by being out of the building and observing customer behaviour… or it could be through looking at customer usage statistics generated by your OSS. That data might just show what a customer is doing… or not doing (eg customers might do small volume transactions through the OSS user interface, but have a hack for bulk transactions because the UI isn’t efficient at scale).

Not sure if it’s indicative of the industry as a whole, but my experience working for / with vendors is that they don’t heavily subscribe to either of these hashtags when designing and refining their products.

Does your OSS collect primary data to #ObserveWhatTheyDoNotWhatTheySay? If it does, do you ever make use of it? Or do you prefer to talk with your uncle (does he know much about OSS BTW)?

Are your OSS better today than they were 5 years ago?

Are your OSS better today than they were 5 years ago?
(or 10, 15, 20 years depending on how long you’ve been in the industry) 

Your immediate reaction to this question is probably going to be, “Yes!” After all, you and your peers have put so much effort into your OSS in the last 5 years. They have to be better right?

On the basis of effort, our OSS are definitely more capable… but let me ask again, “Are they better?”

How do they stack up on key metrics such as:

  1. Do they need less staff to run / maintain
  2. Do they allow products to be released more quickly to market
  3. Do they allow customer services to be ready for service (RFS) faster
  4. Are mean times to repair (MTTR) faster when there’s a problem in the network
  5. Are bills more accurate (and need less intervention across all of the parties that contribute)
  6. Are there less fall-outs (eg customer activations that get lost in the ether)
  7. Are we better at delivering (or maintaining) OSS on budget
  8. Are your CAPEX and OPEX budgets lower
  9. Are our front-office staff (eg retail, contact centres, etc) able to give better outcomes for customers via our OSS/BSS
  10. Are our average truck-rolls per activation lower
  11. Are the insights we’re identifying generating longer-run competitive advantages
  12. etc, etc

Maybe it’s the rose-coloured glasses, but my answer to the initial question when framed against these key metrics is, “Probably not,” but with a couple of caveats.

Our OSS are certainly far more complicated. The bubble in which we operate is far more complicated (ie network types, product offerings, technology options, contact channels, more touchpoints, etc). This means more variants for our OSS / BSS to handle. In addition, we’ve added a lot more functionality (ie complexity of our own).

Comparison of metrics will vary greatly across different OSS operators – some for the better, some worse. Maybe I’m just working on projects that are more challenging now than I was 5, 10, 15 years ago.

Do you have the data to confirm / deny that your OSS is better than in years past?

PS. Oh, and one last call-out. You’ll notice that the metrics above tend to be cross-silo. I have no doubt that individual OSS products have improved in terms of functionality, usability, processing speeds, etc. But what about our end-to-end workflows through our OSS/BSS suite of products?