Just in time design

It’s interesting how we tend to go in cycles. Back in the early days of OSS, the network operators tended to build their OSS from the ground up. Then we went through a phase of using Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) OSS software developed by third-party vendors. We now seem to be cycling back towards in-house development, but with collaboration that includes vendors and external assistance through open-source projects like ONAP. Interesting too how Agile fits in with these cycles.

Regardless of where we are in the cycle for our OSS, as implementers we’re always challenged with finding the Goldilocks amount of documentation – not too heavy, not too light, but just right.

The Agile Manifesto espouses, “working software over comprehensive documentation.” Sounds good to me! It perplexes me that some OSS implementations are bogged down by lengthy up-front documentation phases, especially if we’re basing the solution on COTS offerings. These can really stall the momentum of a project.

Once a solution has been selected (which often does require significant analysis and documentation), I’m more of a proponent of getting the COTS software stood up, even if only in a sandpit environment. This is where just-in-time (JIT) documentation comes into play. Rather than having every aspect of the solution documented (eg process flows, data models, high availability models, physical connectivity, logical connectivity, databases, etc, etc), we only need enough documentation for collaborative stakeholders to do their parts (eg IT to set up hardware / hosting, networks to set up physical connectivity, vendor to provide software, integrator to perform build, etc) to stand up a vanilla solution.

Then it’s time to start building trial scenarios through the solution. There’s usually quite a bit of trial and error in this stage, as we seek to optimise the scenarios for the intended users. Then we add a few more scenarios.

There’s little point trying to document the solution in detail before a scenario is trialled, but some documentation can be really helpful. For example, if the scenario is to build a small sub-section of a network, then draw up some diagrams of that sub-network that include the intended naming conventions for each object (eg device, physical connectivity, addresses, logical connectivity, etc). That allows you to determine whether there are unexpected challenges with naming conventions, data modelling, process design, etc. There are always unexpected challenges that arise!

I figure you’re better off documenting the real challenges than theorising on the “what if?” challenges, which is what often happens with up-front documentation exercises. There are always brilliant stakeholders who can imagine millions of possible challenges, but these often bog the design phase down.

With JIT design, once the solution evolves, the documentation can evolve too… if there is an ongoing reason for its existence (eg as a user guide, for a test plan, as a training cheat-sheet, a record of configuration for fault-finding purposes, etc).

Interestingly, the first value in the Agile Manifesto is, “individuals and interactions over processes and tools.” This is where the COTS vs in-house-dev comes back into play. When using COTS software, individuals, interactions and processes are partly driven by what the tools support. COTS functionality constrains us but we can still use Agile configuration and customisation to optimise our solution for our customers’ needs (where cost-benefit permits).

Having a working set of vanilla tools allows our customers to get a much better feel for what needs to be done rather than trying to understand the intent of up-front design documentation. And that’s the key to great customer outcomes – having the customers knowledgeable enough about the real solution (not hypothetical solutions) to make the most informed decisions possible.

Of course there are always challenges with this JIT design model too, especially when third-party contracts are involved!

Using risk reversal to design OSS

There’s a concept in sales called “risk reversal” that takes all of the customers’ likely issues with a product and provides answers to alleviate customer concerns. I believe we can apply the same concept to OSS, not just to sell them, but to design them.

To borrow from a risk register page here on PAOSS, the major categories of risk that appear on almost all OSS projects are:

  • Organisational change management – the OSS will touch almost all parts of a business and a large number of people within the organisation. If all parts of the business is not conditioned to the change then the implementation will not be successful even if the technical deliverables are faultless. Change management has many, many layers but one way to minimise change management is to make the products and processes highly intuitive. I feel that intuitive OSS will come from a focus on design and simplification rather than our current focus on constantly adding more features. The aim should be to create OSS that are as easy for operators to start using as office tools like spreadsheets, word processors, presentation applications, etc
  • Data integrity – the OSS is only as good as good as the data that is being fed to it. If the quality of data in the OSS database is poor then operational staff will quickly lose faith in the tools. The product-based techniques that can be used to overcome this risk include:
    • Design tools / data model to cope with poor data quality, but also flag it as low confidence for future repair
    • Reduction in data relationships / dependencies (ie referential integrity) to ensure that quality problems don’t have a domino effect on OSS usability
    • Building checks and balances that ensure the data can be reconciled and quality remains high
    • Incorporate closed-loop processes to ensure data quality is continually improved, rather than the open-loop processes that tend to lead to data quality degradation
  • Application functionality mapping to real business needs OSS have been around long enough to have all but run out of features for vendors to differentiate against. The truly useful functionality has arisen from real business needs. “Wish-list” functionality that adds little tangible business benefit or requires significant effort is just adding product and project risk
  • Northbound Interface / Integration – Costs and risks of integrations are significant on each OSS project. There are many techniques that can be used to reduce risk such as a Minimum Viable Data (ie less data types to collect across an interface), standardised destination mapping models, etc but the industry desperately needs major innovation here
  • Implementation – there are so many sources of risk within this category, as is to be expected on any large, complex project. Taking the PMP approach to risk reduction, we can apply the Triple Constraint model

Aggregated OSS buying models

Last week we discussed a sell-side co-op business model. Today we’ll look at buy-side co-op models.

In other industries, we hear of buying groups getting great deals through aggregated buying volumes. This is a little harder to achieve with products that are as uniquely customised as OSS. It’s possible that OSS buy-side aggregation could occur for operators that are similar in nature but don’t compete (eg regional operators). Having said that, I’ve yet to see any co-ops formed to gain OSS group-purchase benefits. If you have, I’d love to hear about it.

In OSS, there are three approaches that aren’t exactly co-op buying models but do aggregate the evaluation and buying decision.

The most obvious is for corporations that run multiple carriers under one umbrella such as Telefonica (see Telefonica’s various OSS / BSS contract notifications here), SingTel (group contracts here), etisalat, etc. There would appear to benefits in standardising OSS platforms across each of the group companies.

A far less formal co-op buying model I’ve noticed is the social-proof approach. This is where one, typically large, network operator in a region goes through an extensive OSS / BSS evaluation and chooses a vendor. Then there’s a domino effect where other, typically smaller, network operators also buy from the same vendor.

Even less formal again is by using third-party organisations like Passionate About OSS to assist with a standard vendor selection methodology. The vendors selected aren’t standardised because each operator’s needs are different, but the product / vendor selection methodology builds on the learnings of past selection processes across multiple operators. The benefits comes in the evaluation and decision frameworks.

How an OSS is like an F1 car

A recent post discussed the challenge of getting a timeslice of operations people to help build the OSS. That post surmised, “as the old saying goes, you get back what you put in. In the case of OSS I’ve seen it time and again that operations need to contribute significantly to the implementation to ensure they get a solution that fits their needs.”

I have a new saying for you today, this time from T.D. Jakes, “You can’t be committed to the dream. You have to be committed to the process.”

If you’re representing an organisation that is buying an OSS solution from a vendor / integrator, please consider these two adages above. Sometimes we’re good at forming the dream (eg business requirements, business case, etc) and expecting the vendor to conduct almost all of the process. While our network operations teams are hired for the process of managing the network, we also need their significant input on the process of building / configuring an OSS. The vendor / integrator can’t just develop it in isolation and then hand it over to ops with a few days of training at the end.

The process of bringing a new OSS into an organisation is not like buying a road car. With an OSS, you can’t just place an order with some optional features like paint and trim specified, then expect to start driving it as soon as it leaves the vendor’s assembly line. It’s more like an F1 car where the driver is in constant communications with the pit-crew, changing and tweaking and refining to optimise the car to the driver’s unique needs (and in turn to hopefully optimise the results).

At least, that’s what current-state OSS are like. Perhaps in the future… we’ll strive to refine our OSS to be more like a road-car – standardised and intuitive enough for operators to drive straight off the assembly line.

Orchestration looks a bit like provisioning

The following is the result of a survey question posed by TM Forum:
Number 1 Driver for Orchestration

I’m not sure how the numbers tally, but conceptually the graph above paints an interesting perspective of why orchestration is important. The graph indicates the why.

But in this case, for me, the why is the by-product of the how. The main attraction of orchestration models is in how we can achieve modularity. All of the business outcomes mentioned in the graph above will only be achievable as a result of modularity.

Put another way, rather than having the integration spaghetti of an “old-school” OSS / BSS stack, orchestration (and orchestration plans) potentially provides the ability to provide clearer demarcation and abstraction all the way from product design down into transactions that hit the network… not to mention the meet-in-the-middle points between business units.

Demarcation points support catalog items (perhaps as APIs / microservices with published contracts), allowing building-block design of products rather than involvement of (and disputes between) business units all down the line of product design. This facilitates the speed (34%) and services on demand (28%) objectives stated in the graph.

But I used the term “old-school” with intent above. The modularity mentioned above was already achieved in some older OSS too. The ability to carve up, sequence, prioritise and re-construct a stream of service orders was already achievable by some provisioning + workflow engines of the past.

The business outcomes remain the same now as they were then, but perhaps orchestration takes it to the next level.

A defacto spatial manager

Many years ago, I was lucky enough to lead a team responsible for designing a complex inside and outside plant network in a massive oil and gas precinct. It had over 120 buildings and more than 30 networked systems.

We were tasked with using CAD (Computer Aided Design) and Office tools to design the comms and security solution for the precinct. And when I say security, not just network security, but building access control, number plate recognition, coast guard and even advanced RADAR amongst other things.

One of the cool aspects of the project was that it was more three-dimensional than a typical telco design. A telco cable network is usually planned on x and y coordinates because the y coordinate is usually on one or two planes (eg all ducts are at say 0.6m below ground level or all catenary wires between poles are at say 5m above ground). However, on this site, cable trays ran at all sorts of levels to run around critical gas processing infrastructure.

We actually proposed to implement a light-weight OSS for management of the network, including outside plant assets, due to the easy maintainability compared with CAD files. The customer’s existing CAD files may have been perfect when initially built / handed-over, but were nearly useless to us because of all the undocumented that had happened in the ensuing period. However, the customer was used to CAD files and wanted to stay with CAD files.

This led to another cool aspect of the project – we had to build out defacto OSS data models to capture and maintain the designs.

We modelled:

  • The support plane (trayway, ducts, sub-ducts, trenches, lead-ins, etc)
  • The physical connectivity plane (cables, splices, patch-panels, network termination points, physical ports, devices, etc)
  • The logical connectivity plane (circuits, system connectivity, asset utilisation, available capacity, etc)
  • Interconnection between these planes
  • Life-cycle change management

This definitely gave a better appreciation for the type of rules, variants and required data sets that reside under the hood of a typical OSS.

Have you ever had a non-OSS project that gave you a better appreciation / understanding of OSS?

I’m also curious. Have any of you used designed your physical network plane in three dimensions? With a custom or out-of-the-box tool?

Taking SMEs out of ops to build an OSS

OSS are there to do just that – support operations. So as OSS implementers we have to do just that too.

But as the old saying goes, you get back what you put in. In the case of OSS I’ve seen it time and again that operations need to contribute significantly to the implementation to ensure they get a solution that fits their needs.

Just one problem here though. Operations are hired to operate the network, not build OSS. Now let’s assume the operations team does decide to commit heavily to your OSS build, thus taking away from network ops at some level (unless they choose to supplement the ops team).

That still leaves operations team leaders with a dilemma. Do they take certain SMEs out of ops to focus entirely on the OSS build (and thus act as nominees for the rest of the team) or do they cycle many of their ops people through the dual roles (at risk of task-switching inefficiency)?

There are pros and cons with each aren’t there? Which would you choose and why? Do you have an alternate approach?

OSS compromise, no, prioritise

On Friday, we talked about how making compromises on OSS can actually be a method for reducing risk. We used the OSS vendor selection process to discuss the point, where many stakeholders contribute to the list of requirements that help to select the best-fit product for the organisation.

To continue with this same theme, I’d like to introduce you to a way of prioritising requirements that borrows from the risk / likelihood matrix commonly used in project management.

The diagram below shows the matrix as it applies to OSS.
OSS automation grid

The y-axis shows the frequency of use (of a particular feature / requirement). They x-axis shows the time / cost savings that will result from having this functionality or automation.

If you add two extra columns to your requirements list, the frequency of use and the resultant savings, you’ll quickly identify which requirements are highest priority (green) based on business benefit. Naturally there are other factors to consider, such as cost-benefit, but it should quickly narrow down to your 80/20 that will allow your OSS to make the most difference.

The same model can be used to sub-prioritise too. For example, you might have a requirement to activate orders – but some orders will occur very frequently, whilst other order types occur rarely. In this case, when configuring the order activation functionality, it might make sense to prioritise on the green order types first.

OSS compromise, not compromised

When you’ve got multiple powerful parties involved in a decision, compromise is unavoidable. The point is not that compromise is a necessary evil. Rather, compromise can be valuable in itself, because it demonstrates that you’ve made use of diverse opinions, which is a way of limiting risk.”
Chip and Dan Heath
in their book, Decisive.

This risk perspective on compromise (ie diversity of thought), is a fascinating one in the context of OSS.

Let’s just look at Vendor Selection as one example scenario. In the lead-up to buying a new OSS, there are always lots of different requirements that are thrown into the hat. These requirements are likely to come from more than one business unit, and from a diverse set of actors / contributors. This process, the OSS Thrashing process, tends to lead to some very robust discussions. Even in the highly unlikely event of every requirement being met by a single OSS solution, there are still compromises to be made in terms of prioritisation on which features are introduced first. Or which functionality is dropped / delayed if funding doesn’t permit.

The more likely situation is that each of the product options will have different strengths and weaknesses, each possibly aligning better or worse to some of the requirement contributor needs. By making the final decision, some requirements will be included, others precluded. Compromise isn’t an option, it’s a reality. The perspective posed by the Heath brothers is whether all requirement contributors enter the OSS vendor selection process prepared for compromise (thus diversity of thought) or does one actor / business-unit seek to steamroll the process (thus introducing greater risk)?

An OSS doomsday scenario

If I start talking about doomsday scenarios where the global OSS job industry is decimated, most people will immediately jump to the conclusion that I’m predicting an artificial intelligence (AI) takeover. AI could have a role to play, but is not a key facet of the scenario I’m most worried about.
OSS doomsday scenario

You’d think that OSS would be quite a niche industry, but there must be thousands of OSS practitioners in my home town of Melbourne alone. That’s partly due to large projects currently being run in Australia by major telcos such as nbn, Telstra, SingTel-Optus and Vodafone, not to mention all the smaller operators. Some of these projects are likely to scale back in coming months / years, meaning less seats in a game of OSS musical chairs. But this isn’t the doomsday scenario I’m hinting at in the title either. There will still be many roles at the telcos and the vendors / integrators that support them.

There are hundreds of OSS vendors in the market now, with no single dominant player. It’s a really fragmented market that would appear to be ripe for M&A (mergers and acquisitions). Ripe for consolidation, but massive consolidation is still not the doomsday scenario because there would still be many OSS roles in that situation.

The doomsday scenario I’m talking about is one where only one OSS gains domination globally. But how?

Most traditional telcos have a local geographic footprint with partners/subsidiaries in other parts of the world, but are constrained by the costs and regulations of a wired or cellular footprint to be able to reach all corners of the globe. All that uniqueness currently leads to the diversity of OSS offerings we see today. The doomsday scenario arises if one single network operator usurps all the traditional telcos and their legacy network / OSS / BSS stacks in one technological fell swoop.

How could a disruption of that magnitude happen? I’m not going to predict, but a satellite constellation such as the one proposed by Starlink has some of the hallmarks of such a scenario. By using low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites (ie lower latency than geostationary satellite solutions), point-to-point laser interconnects between them and peering / caching of data in the sky, it could fundamentally change the world of communications and OSS.

It has global reach, no need for carrier interconnect (hence no complex contract negotiations or OSS/BSS integration for that matter), no complicated lead-in negotiations or reinstatements, no long-haul terrestrial or submarine cable systems. None of the traditional factors that cost so much time and money to get customers connected and keep them connected (only the complication of getting and keeping the constellation of birds in the sky – but we’ll put that to the side for now). It would be hard for traditional telcos to compete.

I’m not suggesting that Starlink can or will be THE ubiquitous global communications network. What if Google, AWS or Microsoft added this sort of capability to their strengths in hosting / data? Such a model introduces a new, consistent network stack without the telcos’ tech debt burdens discussed here. The streamlined network model means the variant tree is millions of times simpler. And if the variant tree is that much simpler, so is the operations model and so is the OSS… with one distinct contradiction. It would need to scale for billions of customers rather than millions and trillions of events.

You might be wondering about all the enterprise OSS. Won’t they survive? Probably not. Comms networks are generally just an important means-to-an-end for enterprises. If the one global network provider were to service every organisation with local or global WANs, as well as all the hosting they would need, and hosted zero-touch network operations like Google is already pre-empting, would organisation have a need to build or own an on-premises OSS?

One ubiquitous global network, with a single pared back but hyperscaled OSS, most likely purpose-built with self-healing and/or AI as core constructs (not afterthoughts / retrofits like for existing OSS). How many OSS roles would survive that doomsday scenario?

Do you have an alternative OSS doomsday scenario that you’d like to share?

Hat tip again to Jay Fenton for pointing out what Starlink has been up to.

The OSS MoSCoW requirement prioritisation technique

Since the soccer World Cup is currently taking place in Russia, I thought I’d include reference to the MoSCoW technique in today’s blog. It could be used as part of your vendor selection processes for the purpose of OSS requirement prioritisation.

The term MoSCoW itself is an acronym derived from the first letter of each of four prioritization categories (Must have, Should have, Could have, and Won’t have), with the interstitial Os added to make the word pronounceable.”
Wikipedia.

It can be used to rank the importance an OSS operator gives to each of their requirements, such as the sample below:

Index Description MoSCoW
1 Requirement #1 Must have (mandatory)
2 Requirement #2 Should have (desired)
3 Requirement #3 Could have (optional)
4 Requirement #5 Won’t have (not required)

But that’s only part of the story in a vendor selection process – the operator’s wish-list. This needs to be cross-referenced with a vendor or solution integrator’s ability to deliver to those wishes. This is where the following compliance codes come in:

  • FC – Fully Compliant – This functionality is available in the baseline installation of the proposed OSS
  • NC – Non-compliant – This functionality is not able to be supported by the proposed OSS
  • PC – Partially Compliant – This functionality is partially supported by the proposed OSS (a vendor description of what is / isn’t supported is required)
  • WC – Will Comply – This functionality is not available in the baseline installation of the proposed software, but will be provided via customisation of the proposed OSS
  • CC – Can Comply – This functionality is possible, but not part of the offer and can be provided at additional cost

So a quick example might look like the following:

Index Description MoSCoW Compliance Comment
1 Requirement #1 Must have (mandatory) FC
2 Requirement #2 Should have (desired) PC Can only delivery the functionality of 2a, not 2b in this solution

Yellow columns are created by the operator / customer, blue cells are populated by the vendor / SI. I usually also add blue columns to indicate which product module delivers the compliance and room to pose questions / assumptions back to the customer.

BTW. I’ve only heard of the MoSCoW acronym recently but have been using a similar technique for years. My prioritisation approach is a little simpler. I just use Mandatory, Preferred, Optional.

The OSS dart-board analogy

The dartboard, by contrast, is not remotely logical, but is somehow brilliant. The 20 sector sits between the dismal scores of five and one. Most players aim for the triple-20, because that’s what professionals do. However, for all but the best darts players, this is a mistake. If you are not very good at darts, your best opening approach is not to aim at triple-20 at all. Instead, aim at the south-west quadrant of the board, towards 19 and 16. You won’t get 180 that way, but nor will you score three. It’s a common mistake in darts to assume you should simply aim for the highest possible score. You should also consider the consequences if you miss.”
Rory Sutherland
on Wired.

When aggressive corporate goals and metrics are combined with brilliant solution architects, we tend to aim for triple-20 with our OSS solutions don’t we? The problem is, when it comes to delivery, we don’t tend to have the laser-sharp precision of a professional darts player do we? No matter how experienced we are, there tends to be hidden surprises – some technical, some personal (or should I say inter-personal?), some contractual, etc – that deflect our aim.

The OSS dart-board analogy asks the question about whether we should set the lofty goals of a triple-20 [yellow circle below], with high risk of dismal results if we miss (think too about the OSS stretch-goal rule); or whether we’re better to target the 19/16 corner of the board [blue circle below] that has scaled back objectives, but a corresponding reduction in risk.

OSS Dart-board Analogy

Roland Leners posed the following brilliant question, “What if we built OSS and IT systems around people’s willingness to change instead of against corporate goals and metrics? Would the corporation be worse off at the end?” in response to a recent post called, “Did we forget the OSS operating model?

There are too many facets to count on Roland’s question but I suspect that in many cases the corporate goals / metrics are akin to the triple-20 focus, whilst the team’s willingness to change aligns to the 19/16 corner. And that is bound to reduce delivery risk.

I’d love to hear your thoughts!!

1.045 Trillion reasons to re-consider your OSS strategy

The global Internet of Things (IoT) market will be worth $1.1 trillion in revenue by 2025 as market value shifts from connectivity to platforms, applications and services. By that point, there will be more than 25 billion IoT connections (cellular and non-cellular), driven largely by growth in the industrial IoT market. The Asia Pacific region is forecast to become the largest global IoT region in terms of both connections and revenue.
Although connectivity revenue will grow over the period, it will only account for 5 per cent of the total IoT revenue opportunity by 2025, underscoring the need for operators to expand their capabilities beyond connectivity in order to capture a greater share of market value
.”
GSMA Intelligence
, referred to here.

Let’s look at these projected numbers. The GSMA Intelligence report forecasts only 5 cents in every dollar of IoT spend (of a $1.1T market opportunity) will be allocated to connectivity. That leaves $1.045T on the table if network operators just focus on connectivity.

Traditional OSS tend to focus on managing connectivity – less so on managing marketplaces, customer-facing platforms and applications. Does that headline number – $1.045T – provide you with an incentive to re-consider what your OSS manages and future use cases?

IoT OSS market opportunity

IoT requires slightly different OSS thinking:

  • Rather than integrating to a (relatively) small number of device types, IoT will have an almost infinite number of sensor types from a huge range of suppliers.
  • Rather than managing devices individually, their sheer volume means that devices will need to be increasingly managed in cohorts via policy controls.
  • Rather than a fairly narrow set of network-comms based services, functionality explodes into diverse areas like metering, vehicle fleets, health-care, manufacturing, asset controls, etc, etc so IoT controllers will need to be developed by a much longer-tail of suppliers (meaning open development platforms and/or scalable certification processes to integrate into the IoT controller platforms).
  • There are undoubtedly many, many additional differences.

Caveat: I haven’t evaluated the claims / numbers in the GSMA Intelligence report. This blog is just to prompt a thought-experiment around hypothetical projections.

The paint the fence automation analogy

There are so many actions that could be automated by / with / in our OSS. It can be hard to know where to start can’t it? One approach is to look at where the largest amounts of manual effort is being expended by operators. Another way is to employ the “paint the fence” analogy.

When envisaging fulfilment workflows, it’s easiest to picture actions that start with a customer and wipe down through the OSS / BSS stack.

When envisaging assurance workflows, it’s easiest to picture actions that start in the network and wipe up through the OSS / BSS stack.
Paint the fence OSS analogy

Of course there are exceptions to these rules, but to go a step further, wipe down = revenue, wipe up = costs. We want to optimise both through automation of course.

Like ensuring paint coverage when painting a fence, OSS automation has the potential to best improve Customer Experience coverage when we use brushstrokes down and up.

On the downstroke, it’s through faster service activations, quotes, response times, etc. On the upstroke, it’s through network reliability (downtime reduction), preventative maintenance, expedited notifications, etc.

You’ll notice that these are indicators that are favourable to the customers. I’m sure it won’t take much sluething to see the association to trailing metrics that are favourable to the network operators though right?

OSS, the great multipliers

Skills multiply labors by two, five, 10, 50, 100 times. You can chop a tree down with a hammer, but it takes about 30 days. That’s called labor. But if you trade the hammer in for an ax, you can chop the tree down in about 30 minutes. What’s the difference in 30 days and 30 minutes? Skills—skills make the difference.”
Jim Rohn
, here.

OSS can be great labour multipliers. They can deliver baked-in “skills” that multiply labors by two, five, 10, 50, 100 times. They can be not just a hammer, not just an axe, but a turbo-charged chainsaw.

The more pertinent question to understand with our OSS though is, “Why are we chopping this tree down?” Is it the right tree to achieve a useful outcome? Do the benefits outweigh the cost of the hammer / axe / chainsaw?

What if our really clever OSS engineers come up with a brilliant design that can reduce a task from 30 days to 30 minutes…. but it takes us 35 days to design/build/test/deploy the customisation for a once-off use? We’re clearly cutting down the wrong tree.

What if instead we could reduce this same task from 30 days to 1 day with just a quick analysis and process change? It’s nowhere near as sexy or challenging for us OSS engineers though. The very clever 30 minute solution is another case of “just because we can, doesn’t mean we should.”

How to identify a short-list of best-fit OSS suppliers for you

In yesterday’s post, we talked about how to estimate OSS pricing. One of the key pillars of the approach was to first identify a short-list of vendors / integrators best-suited to implementing your specific OSS, then working closely with them to construct a pricing model.

Finding the right vendor / integrator can be a complex challenge. There are dozens, if not hundreds of OSS / BSS solutions to choose from and there are rarely like-for-like comparators. There are some generic comparison tools such as Gartner’s Magic Quadrant, but there’s no way that they can cater for the nuanced requirements of each OSS operator.

Okay, so you don’t want to hear about problems. You want solutions. Well today’s post provides a description of the approach we’ve used and refined across the many product / vendor selection processes we’ve conducted with OSS operators.

We start with a short-listing exercise. You won’t want to deal with dozens of possible suppliers. You’ll want to quickly and efficiently identify a small number of candidates that have capabilities that best match your needs. Then you can invest a majority of your precious vendor selection time in the short-list. But how do you know the up-to-date capabilities of each supplier? We’ll get to that shortly.

For the short-listing process, I use a requirement gathering and evaluation template. You can find a PDF version of the template here. Note that the content within it is out-dated and I now tend to use a more benefit-centric classification rather than feature-centric classification, but the template itself is still applicable.

STEP ONE – Requirement Gathering
The first step is to prepare a list of requirements (as per page 3 of the PDF):
Requirement Capture.
The left-most three columns in the diagram above (in white) are filled out by the operator, which classifies a list of requirements and how important they are (ie mandatory, etc). The depth of requirements (column 2) is up to you and can range from specific technical details to high-level objectives. They could even take the form of user-stories or intended benefits.

STEP TWO – Issue your requirement template to a list of possible vendors
Once you’ve identified the list of requirements, you want to identify a list of possible vendors/integrators that might be able to deliver on those requirements. The PAOSS vendor/product list might help you to identify possible candidates. We then send the requirement matrix to the vendors. Note that we also send an introduction pack that provides the context of the solution the OSS operator needs.

STEP THREE – Vendor Self-analysis
The right-most three columns in the diagram above (in aqua) are designed to be filled out by the vendor/integrator. The suppliers are best suited to fill out these columns because they best understand their own current offerings and capabilities.
Note that the status column is a pick-list of compliance level, where FC = Fully Compliant. See page 2 of the template for other definitions. Given that it is a self-assessment, you may choose to change the Status (vendor self-rankings) if you know better and/or ask more questions to validate the assessments.
The “Module” column identifies which of the vendor’s many products would be required to deliver on the requirement. This column becomes important later on as it will indicate which product modules are most important for the overall solution you want. It may allow you to de-prioritise some modules (and requirements) if price becomes an issue.

STEP FOUR – Compare Responses
Once all the suppliers have returned their matrix of responses, you can compare them at a high-level based on the summary matrix (on page 1 of the template)
OSS Requirement Summary
For each of the main categories, you’ll be able to quickly see which vendors are the most FC (Fully Compliant) or NC (Non-Compliant) on the mandatory requirements.

Of course you’ll need to analyse more deeply than just the Summary Matrix, but across all the vendor selection processes we’ve been involved with, there has always been a clear identification of the suppliers of best fit.

Hopefully the process above is fairly clear. If not, contact us and we’d be happy to guide you through the process.

Getting a price estimate for your OSS

Sometimes a simple question deserves a simple answer: “A piece of string is twice as long as half its length”. This is a brilliant answer… if you have its length… Without a strategy, how do you know if it is successful? It might be prettier, but is it solving a define business problem, saving or making money, or fulfilling any measurable goals? In other words: can you measure the string?
Carmine Porco
here.

I was recently asked how to obtain OSS pricing by a University student for a paper-based assignment. To make things harder, the target client was to be a tier-2 telco with a small SDN / NFV network.

As you probably know already, very few OSS providers make their list prices known. The few vendors that do tend to focus on the high volume, self-serve end of the market, which I’ll refer to as “Enterprise Grade.” I haven’t heard of any “Telco Grade” OSS suppliers making their list prices available to the public.

There are so many variables when finding the right OSS for a customer’s needs and the vendors have so much pricing flexibility that there is no single definitive number. There are also rarely like-for-like alternatives when selecting an OSS vendor / product. Just like the fabled piece of string, the best way is to define the business problem and get help to measure it. In the case of OSS pricing, it’s to design a set of requirements and then go to market to request quotes.

Now, I can’t imagine many vendors being prepared to invest their valuable time in developing pricing based on paper studies, but I have found them to be extremely helpful when there’s a real buyer. I’ll caveat that by saying that if the customer (eg service provider) you’re working with is prepared to invest the time to help put a list of requirements together then you have a starting point to approach the market for customised pricing.

We’ve run quite a few of these vendor selections and have refined the process along the way to streamline for vendors and customers alike. Here’s a template we’ve used as a starting point for discussions with customers:

OSS vendor selection process

Note that each customer will end up with a different mapping of the diagram above to suit their specific needs. We also have existing templates (eg Questionnaire, Requirement Matrix, etc) to support the selection process where needed.

If you’re interested in reading more about the process of finding the right OSS vendor and pricing for you, click here and here.

Of course, we’d also be delighted to help if you need assistance to develop an OSS solution, get OSS pricing estimates, develop a workable business case and/or find the right OSS vendor/products for you.

Using OSS/BSS to steer the ship

For network operators, our OSS and BSS touch most parts of the business. The network, and the services they carry, are core business so a majority of business units will be contributing to that core business. As such, our OSS and BSS provide many of the metrics used by those business units.

This is a privileged position to be in. We get to see what indicators are most important to the business, as well as the levers used to control those indicators. From this privileged position, we also get to see the aggregated impact of all these KPIs.

In your years of working on OSS / BSS, how many times have you seen key business indicators that are conflicting between business units? They generally become more apparent on cross-team projects where the objectives of one internal team directly conflict with the objectives of another internal team/s.

In theory, a KPI tree can be used to improve consistency and ensure all business units are pulling towards a common objective… [but what if, like most organisations, there are many objectives? Does that mean you have a KPI forest and the trees end up fighting for light?]

But here’s a thought… Have you ever seen an OSS/BSS suite with the ability to easily build KPI trees? I haven’t. I’ve seen thousands of standalone reports containing myriad indicators, but never a consolidated roll-up of metrics. I have seen a few products that show operational metrics rolled-up into a single dashboard, but not business metrics. They appear to have been designed to show an information hierarchy, but not necessarily with KPI trees in mind specifically.

What do you think? Does it make sense for us to offer KPI trees as base product functionality from our reporting modules? Would this functionality help our OSS/BSS add more value back into the businesses we support?

Operator involvement on OSS projects

You cannot simply have your end users give some specifications then leave while you attempt to build your new system. They need to be involved throughout the process. Ultimately, it is their tool to use.”
José Manuel De Arce
here.

As an OSS consultant and implementer, I couldn’t agree more with José’s quote above. José, by the way is an OSS Manager at Telefónica, so he sits on the operator’s side of the implementation equation. I’m glad he takes the perspective he does.

Unfortunately, many OSS operators are so busy with operations, they don’t get the time to help with defining and tuning the solutions that are being built for them. It’s understandable. They are measured by their ability to keep the network (and services) running and in a healthy state.

From the implementation side, it reminds me of this old comic:
Too busy

The comic reminds me of OSS implementations for two reasons:

  1. Without ongoing input from operators, you can only guess at how the new tools could improve their efficacy and mitigate their challenges
  2. Without ongoing involvement from operators, they don’t learn the nuances of how the new tool works or the scenarios it’s designed to resolve… what I refer to as an OSS apprenticeship

I’ve seen it time after time on OSS implementations (and other projects for that matter) – [As a customer] you get back what you put in.

The Goldilocks OSS story

We all know the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears where Goldilocks chooses the option that’s not too heavy, not too light, but just right.

The same model applies to OSS – finding / building a solution that’s not too heavy, not too light, but just right. To be honest, we probably tend to veer towards the too heavy, especially over time. We put more complexity into our architectures, integrations and customisations… because we can… which end up burdening us and our solutions.

A perfect example is AT&T offering its ECOMP project (now part of the even bigger Linux Foundation Network Fund) up for open source in the hope that others would contribute and help mature it. As a fairytale analogy, it’s an admission that it’s too heavy even for one of the global heavyweights to handle by itself.

The ONAP Charter has some great plans including, “…real-time, policy-driven orchestration and automation of physical and virtual network functions that will enable software, network, IT and cloud providers and developers to rapidly automate new services and support complete lifecycle management.”

These are fantastic ambitions to strive for, especially at the Pappa Bear end of the market. I have huge admiration for those who are creating and chasing bold OSS plans. But what about for the large majority of customers that fall into the Goldilocks category? Is our field of vision so heavy (ie so grand and so far into the future) that we’re missing the opportunity to solve the business problems of our customers and make a difference for them with lighter solutions today?

TM Forum’s Digital Transformation World is due to start in just over two weeks. It will be fascinating to see how many of the presentations and booths consider the Goldilocks requirements. There probably won’t be many because it’s just not as sexy a story as one that mentions heavy solutions like policy-driven orchestration, zero-touch automation, AI / ML / analytics, self-scaling / self-healing networks, etc.

[I should also note that I fall into the category of loving to listen to the heavy solutions too!! ]