OSS Best Practices, cough, splutter

Organizations that seek transformations frequently bring in an army of outside consultants [or implementers in the case of OSS] who tend to apply one-size-fits-all solutions in the name of “best practices.” Our approach to transforming our respective organizations is to rely instead on insiders — staff who have intimate knowledge about what works and what doesn’t in their daily operations.”
Behnam Tabrizi, Ed Lam, Kirk Gerard and Vernon Irvin here

I don’t know about you, but the term “best practices” causes me make funny noises. A cross between a laugh, cough, derisive snicker and chortle. This noise isn’t always audible, but it definitely sounds inside my head any time someone mentions best practices in the field of OSS.

There are two reasons for my bemusement, no, actually there’s a third, which I’ll share as the story that follows. The first two reasons are:

  • That every OSS project is so different that chaos theory applies. I’m all for systematising aspects of OSS projects to create repeatable building blocks (like TM Forum does with tools such as eTOM). But as much as I build and use repeatable approaches, I know they always have to be customised for each client situation
  • Best practices becomes a mind-set that can prevent the outsiders / implementers from listening to insiders

Luckily, out of all the OSS projects I’ve worked on, there’s only been one where the entire implementation team has stuck with their “best practices” mantra throughout the project.

The team used this phrase as the intellectual high-ground over their OSS-novice clients. To paraphrase their words, “This is best practice. We’ve done it this way successfully for dozens of customers in the past, so you must do it our way.” Interestingly, this project was the most monumental failure of any OSS I’ve worked on.

The implementation team’s organisation lost out because the project was halted part-way through. The client lost out because they had almost no OSS functionality to show for their resource investment.

The project was canned largely because the implementation company wasn’t prepared to budge from their “best practices” thinking. To be honest, their best practices approaches were quite well formed. The only problem was that the changes they were insisting on (to accommodate their 10-person team of outsiders) would’ve caused major re-organisation of the client’s 100,000-person company of insiders. The outsiders / implementers either couldn’t see that or were so arrogant that they wanted the client to bend anyway.

That was a failure on their behalf no doubt, but not the monumental failure. I could see the massive cultural disconnect between client and implementer very early. I could even see the way to fix it (I believe). I was their executive advisor (the bridge between outsiders and insiders) so the monumental failure was mine. Not through lack of trying, I was unable to persuade either party to consider the other’s perspective.

Without compromise, the project became compromised.

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One thought on “OSS Best Practices, cough, splutter

  1. Thanks for sharing this post… Two thumbs up from me Ryan as it certainly resonates! My observation a couple of years ago to someone I was working with was, “if we all are doing best practices, doesn’t that just mean we are all just doing bog standard?”

    Like the Peter Drucker quote, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast“, I was happy to see with successful DevOps implementation that cultural change is the first thing that has to be done right before the technology and processes. What Is In This For Me really needs to be cascaded down from the top (C-level) down to the workers, talking to their needs and getting their buy-in. Shame that the project was a failure, but definitely a learning experience hey?

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