Should your OSS have an exit strategy in mind?

What does the integration map of your OSS suite look like? Does it have lots of meatballs with a spaghetti of interconnections? Is it possibly even too entangled that even creating an integration map would be a nightmare?

Similarly, how many customisations have you made to your out-of-the-box tools?

In recent posts we’ve discussed the frenzy of doing without necessarily considering the life-time costs of all those integrations and customisations. There’s no doubt that most of those tweaks will add capability to the solution, but the long-term costs aren’t always factored in.

We also talk about ruthless subtraction projects. There are many reasons why it’s easier to talk about reduction projects than actually achieve them. Mostly it’s because the integrations and customisations have entwined the solutions so tightly that it’s nearly impossible to wind them back.

But what if, like many start-ups, you had an exit strategy in mind when introducing a new OSS tool into your suite? There is an inevitability of obsolescence in OSS, either through technology change, moving business requirements, breakdowns in supplier / partnership relationships, etc. However, most tools stay around for longer than their useful shelf life because of their stickiness. So why not keep rigid control over the level of stickiness via your exit strategy?

My interpretation of an exit strategy is to ensure by-play with other systems happens at data level rather than integrations and customisations to the OSS tools. It also includes ruthless minimisation of snowball dependencies* within that data. Just because integrations can be done, doesn’t mean they should be done.

* Snowball dependencies are when one builds on another, builds on another, which is a common OSS occurrence.

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