The 7 truck-roll fail

In yesterday’s post we talked about the cost of quality. We talked about examples of primary, secondary and tertiary costs of bad data quality (DQ). We also highlighted that the tertiary costs, including the damage to brand reputation, can be one of the biggest factors.

I often cite an example where it took 7 truck rolls to connect a service to my house a few years ago. This provider was unable to provide an estimate of when their field staff would arrive each day, so it meant I needed to take a full day off work on each of those 7 occasions.

The primary cost factors are fairly obvious, for me, for the provider and for my employer at the time. On the direct costs alone, it would’ve taken many months, if not years, for the provider to recoup their install costs. Most of it attributable to the OSS/BSS and associated processes.

Many of those 7 truck rolls were a direct result of having bad or incomplete data:

  • They didn’t record that it was a two storey house (and therefore needed a crew with “working at heights” certification and gear)
  • They didn’t record that the install was at a back room at the house (and therefore needed a higher-skilled crew to perform the work)
  • The existing service was installed underground, but they had no records of the route (they went back to the designs and installed a completely different access technology because replicating the existing service was just too complex)

Customer Experience (CX), aka brand damage, is the greatest of all cost of quality factors when you consider studies such as those mentioned below.

A dissatisfied customer will tell 9-15 people about their experience. Around 13% of dissatisfied customers tell more than 20 people.”
White House Office of Consumer Affairs
(according to customerthink.com).

Through this page alone, I’ve told a lot more than 20 (although I haven’t mentioned the provider’s name, so perhaps it doesn’t count! 🙂  ).

But the point is that my 7 truck-roll example above could’ve been avoided if the provider’s OSS/BSS gave better information to their field workers (or perhaps enforced that the field workers populated useful data).

We’ll talk a little more tomorrow about modern Field Services tools and how our OSS/BSS can impact CX in a much more positive way.

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