The Theory of Evolution, OSS evolution

Evolution says that biological change is a property of populations — that every individual is a trial run of an experimental combination of traits, and that at the end of the trial, you are done and discarded, and the only thing that matters is what aggregate collection of traits end up in the next generation. The individual is not the focus, the population is. And that’s hard for many people to accept, because their entire perception is centered on self and the individual.”
FreeThoughtBlog.

Have we almost reached the point where the same can be said for OSS workflows? In the past (and the present?) we had pre-defined process flows. There may be an occasional if/else decision gate, but we could capture most variants on a process diagram. These pre-defined processes were / are akin to a production line.

Process diagrams are becoming harder to lock down as our decision trees get more complicated. Technologies proliferate, legacy product lines don’t get obsoleted, the number of customer contact channels increases. Not only that, but we’re now marketing to a segment of one, treating every one of our customers as unique, whilst trying not to break our OSS / BSS.

Do we have the technology yet that allows each transaction / workflow instance to just be treated as an experimental combination of attributes / tasks? More importantly, do we have the ability to identify any successful mutations that allow the population (ie the combination of all transactions) to get progressively better, faster, stronger.

It seems that to get to CX nirvana, being able to treat every customer completely uniquely, we need to first master an understanding of the population at scale. Conversely, to achieve the benefits of scale, we need to understand and learn from every customer interaction uniquely.

That’s evolution. The benchmark sets the pattern for future workflows until a variant / mutation identifies a better benchmark to establish the new pattern for future workflows, which continues.

The production line workflow model of the past won’t get us there. We need an evolution workflow model that is designed to accommodate infinite optionality and continually learn from it.

Does such a workflow tool exist yet? Actually, it’s more than a workflow tool. It’s a continually improving loop workflow.

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