What are OSS “platform wrapper” roadblocks?

OSS can be cumbersome at times. Making change can be difficult. We tend to build layers of protections around them and the networks we manage. I get that. Change can be risky (although the protections are often implemented because the OSS and/or network platforms might not be as robust as they could be).

Contrast this with the OSS we want to create. We want to create a platform for rapid innovation, the platform that helps us and our clients generate opportunities and advantages.

For us to build a platform that allows our customers (and their customers) to revolutionise their markets, we might have to consider whether the protective layers around our OSS that are stymying change. Things like firewall burns, change review boards, documentation, approvals, politics, individuals with a reticence to change, etc.

For example, Netflix takes a contrarian, whitelist approach to access by its engineers rather than a blacklist. It assumes that its engineers are professional enough to only use the tools that they need to get their tasks done. They enable their engineers to use commonly off-limits functionality such as adding their own DNS records (ie to support the stand-up of new infrastructure). But they also take a use-it-or-lose-it approach, monitoring the tools that the engineer uses and rescinding access to tools they haven’t used within 90 days. But if they do need access again, it’s as simple as a message on Slack to reinstate it.

This is just one small example of streamlining the platform wrapper. There are probably a million others.

When working on OSS projects as the integrator / installer, I’ve seen many of these “platform wrapper” roadblocks. I’m sure you have too. If you see them as the installer, chances are the ops team you hand over to will also experience these roadblocks.

Question though. Do you flag these platform wrapper roadblocks for improvement, or do you treat them as non-platform and therefore just live with them?

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