Your Theatrical OctopOSS

For Porter, the ultimate profit potential of an industry is a finite fixed amount: the only question is who is going to get which share of it.Sound business is however unlike warfare or sports in that one company’s success does not require its rivals to fail. Unlike competition in sports, every company can choose to invent its own game. As Joan Magretta points out, a better analogy than war or sports is the performing arts. There can be many good singers or actors—each outstanding and successful in a distinctive way. Each finds and creates an audience. The more good performers there are, the more audiences grow and the arts flourish.
Steve Denning
in an article on Forbes.com

In the past, it has been the CSP behemoths that have been the centre of attention when vendors have been designing OSS tools. The companies, the operators and the processes have all been built around the needs of the big CSPs.

But there are only so many CSPs to go around (albeit a growing market through increasing deregulation and de-monopolisation in the telecommunications industry).

Are most vendors focussing their attention on gaining an increase in market share?

Or is there the opportunity to grow the audience and allow your art to flourish? Are there broader markets to target? Are there benefits that the OSS can bring to customers lower down the food chain than the CSP whales? Utilities, government, defence, then further still to enterprise and yet further still?

Conversely, are there end customers (the CSP‘s customers, not just their network operators) to delight and hence drag more big CSPs down the path of using your OSS? Is this the “long-tail” of the OSS industry?

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