Addressing the trauma of OSS

You also have to understand their level of trauma. Your product, service or information is selling a solution to someone who is in trauma. There are different levels, from someone who needs a nail to finish the swing set in their backyard to someone who just found out they have a life-threatening disease. All of your customers had something happen in their life, where the problem got to an unmanageable point that caused them to actively search for your solution.
A buying decision is an emotional decision
.”
John Carlton
.

My clients tend to fall into three (fairly logical) categories:

  1. They’re looking to buy an OSS
  2. They’re looking to sell an OSS
  3. They’re in the process of implementing an OSS

Category 3 clients tend to bring a very technical perspective to the task. Lists of requirements, architectures, designs, processes, training, etc.

Category 2 clients tend to also bring a technical perspective to the task. Lists of features, processes, standards, workflows, etc.

Category 1 clients also tend to break down the buying decision in a technical manner. List of requirements, evaluation criteria, ranking/weighting models, etc.

But what’s interesting about this is that category 1 is actually a very human initiative. It precedes the other two categories (ie it is the lead action). And category 1 clients tend to only reach this state of needing help due to a level of trauma. The buying decision is an emotional decision.

Nobody wants to go through an OSS replacement or the procurement event that precedes it. It’s also a traumatic experience for the many people involved. As much as I love being involved in these projects, I wouldn’t wish them on anyone.

I wonder whether taking the human perspective, actively putting ourselves in the position of understanding the trauma the buyer is experiencing, might change the way we approach all three categories above?

That is, taking less of a technical approach (although that’s still important of course), but more on addressing the trauma. As the first step, do you step back to understand what is the root-cause of your customer’s unique trauma?

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