The challenges in transforming network assurance to network healing

A couple of interesting concepts have the ability to fundamentally change the way networks and services are maintained. If they can be harnessed, we could replace the term “network assurance” with “network healing.”

The first concept is SON, which has been formulated specifically with mobile radio networks in mind, but has the potential to extend into all network types.

A Self-Organizing Network (SON) is an automation technology designed to make the planning, configuration, management, optimization and healing of mobile radio access networks simpler and faster.”

One of the challenges of creating self-organising, self-optimising, self-healing networks is that every network has physical points of failure – cable cuts, equipment failure, etc. These can’t be fixed with software alone. That’s where the second concept comes in.

The second concept is smart-contract technology (possibly facilitated by Blockchain), which provides the potential for a more automated way of engaging a mini procurement / delivery / test / payment process to fix physical problems (or logical for that matter). Whilst the work might be done in the physical world, it could be done by third-parties, initiated by the OSS via microservice. Network Fix as a Service (NFaaS), with implementation, test, acceptance and payment all done in software as far as the OSS sees it.

To an extent this already happens via the issuance of ToW (Tickets of Work) to third party fault-fix teams, but it’s normally a significantly manual process currently.

However, the bigger challenge of transforming network assurance to network healing is to find a way to self-heal services that span multiple network domains. This could be physical network functions (PNF), virtual network functions (VNF) and the myriad topologies, technologies and protocols that interconnect them.

I can’t help but think that to simplify (self-healing) we first have to simplify (network variant minimisation).

If we can drastically reduce the number of variants, we have a better chance of building self-heal automations… and don’t just tell me that AI engines will solve all these problems! Maybe one day, but perhaps we can start with baby steps first.

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